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About Erik Chaput & Russell J. DeSimone

Erik J. Chaput, Ph.D., is the author of The People’s Martyr: Thomas Wilson Dorr and His 1842 Rhode Island Rebellion (2013). Chaput is teaches both at The Lawrenceville School in New Jersey and in the School of Continuing Education at Providence College. Russell DeSimone, an independent historian, is the author of “Remarkable Women of Rhode Island.” (2014). Chaput and DeSimone are also the historians-in-residence on the Dorr Rebellion Project Site sponsored by Providence College and are the editors of the Letters of Thomas Wilson Dorr and the Letters of John Brown Francis. Both collections can be accessed online on the Dorr Rebellion Project Site, http://library.providence.edu/dps/projects/dorr/index.html.
Latest Posts | By Erik Chaput & Russell J. DeSimone
Civil War’s End Revives Suffrage Battles in Rhode Island
8 months ago

Civil War’s End Revives Suffrage Battles in Rhode Island

[The authors dedicate this article to their friend and mentor Patrick T. Conley, the dean of Rhode Island historians.]

From 2010 to 2015, the publishing world was …
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The End of School Segregation in Rhode Island
1 year ago

The End of School Segregation in Rhode Island

No doubt about it, in the decades leading up to the Civil War, a small, but dedicated group of African-American activists, including George Downing of Newport and Ichabod Northup, Ransom …
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A Rhode Islander in the Freedmen’s Bureau
2 years ago

A Rhode Islander in the Freedmen’s Bureau

In the final days of the Civil War, the U.S. Congress established an agency within the War Department that was to have far reaching powers in terms of setting social …
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Sidney Rider and The Business of Rhode Island History
2 years ago

Sidney Rider and The Business of Rhode Island History

More than any other Rhode Islander of his generation, Sidney S. Rider was in the business of history. Rider was the premier bookseller in Rhode Island in the later part …
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Providence’s Merchants Influence the State to Ratify the U.S. Constitution in 1790
3 years ago

Providence’s Merchants Influence the State to Ratify the U.S. Constitution in 1790

There is perhaps no better known expression from the American Revolutionary period than “no taxation without representation.” In July 1768, Silas Downer, a member of the Providence Sons of Liberty, …
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